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A Tale of Two Cashiers

It was the best of cashiers, it was the worst of cashiers …

I did something foolish. I went out shopping on Saturday, December 15th last year. Yep, that Saturday. One of the two or three busiest days of the year. My staff and I used to love those Saturdays at Toy House. We were always pumped up and ready to have all kinds of fun with the crowds of people.

Not this gal.

I waited in line as expected. Placed my items on the belt. Waited some more. When it was finally my turn I said to the cashier a joyful, “Hello. How are you?”

In the most monotonous, apathetic voice she could muster, she answered, “I’m here.”

That was it. She didn’t say anything more until she had rung up all my purchases and asked, “Mperks, bottle slips, or coupons?”

No “Hello.” No “Thank you.” No “Fine, thanks.” She didn’t even say those phrases I really hate at checkout like, “Are you ready to check out?” or “Did you find everything?” Heck, by this point I would have taken any kind of interaction. She didn’t even say, “No problem,” when I thanked her for ringing me up.

Any excitement I had for the upcoming holiday was quickly Grinched out in her doom and gloom. I walked back to my car somewhat deflated and dejected.

Fast forward to yesterday. Same chain, different store. I was greeted with, “Hi, how are you today? Looks like you have a pretty good shopping list here.”

By the time she had finished ringing me up, we knew each other’s names, I knew some of her past work history. I knew why she was working where she was and what she “just loved” about working for them. We talked about my purchases. We laughed about the shopping bags that wouldn’t separate from each other easily.

It was a generally pleasant conversation that ended with, “Thank you for coming in. Hope to see you again.”

I’ve shopped this chain all my life and never once been asked to come back like that. 

According to a John Gattorna study published in 2008, the leading cause for customers to switch stores isn’t product or price. It is indifference. Here are his numbers:

  • 4% Natural attrition (moved away, passed on, etc)
  • 5% Referred to a competitor by their friend
  • 9% Competitive reasons (e.g. price)
  • 14% Product/service dissatisfaction
  • 68% Perceived Indifference

If the “I’m here” cashier had worked for me, she would no longer be “here”. If you can’t be happy and enthused for the busiest time of the year, you don’t belong in retail. At the same time, I would be doing everything in my power to encourage more conversations between my cashiers and customers like the “Hope to see you again,” cashier. I actually do hope I see her again.

-Phil Wrzesinski
www.PhilsForum.com

PS Notice how I didn’t mention anything about their efficiency or skill with the actual cash register and bagging? I have had horrible baggers, slow movers, and cashiers not trained well enough to know even the simple procedures at this chain. But the two that stood out the most were both because of their attitude. 

PPS One of the cashiers was a Baby Boomer. The other was a Millennial. Guess which was which?

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